Charlotte Mason Quotes + Free Printable

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An Observant Child Charlotte Mason Quote

Charlotte Mason is one of my educational heroes.  I love learning so much as I’m slowly making my way through her volumes.  You can check them out Charlotte Mason’s volumes here on Amazon.  We all need a little motivation from time to time and Charlotte Mason always rejuvenates me.  She was quite an inspiring lady who was far ahead of her time!  I’ve been collecting several great Charlotte Mason quotes from her as I’m going through them and this one especially stuck out to me.  I knew I wanted it to be in my homeschool room so I made this printable.  I’m sharing it here today in case anyone else would like to have this sweet reminder in their home too.  I know the pumpkins are a little out of season (I made this in the fall) but I think I’ll keep mine up year round…till I decide to replace it with my next Charlotte Mason quote.

May we all put our children in the way of things worth observing.

You can click the link below to download this pdf.

An observant child should be put in the way of things worth observing.” -Charlotte Mason

Here are some other of my favorite Charlotte Mason Quotes that I’ve come across so far.

 

“Every day, every hour, the parents are either passively or actively forming those habits in their children upon which, more than upon anything else, future character and conduct depend…”-Charlotte Mason

That one is convicting, isn’t it?

 

“The mother who takes pains to endow her children with good habits secures for herself smooth and easy days.” -Charlotte Mason

Also convicting but it simultaneously motivates me to step it up.

 

“Our aim in education is to give a full life. We owe it to them to initiate an immense number of interests. Life should be all living, and not merely a tedious passing of time; not all doing or all feeling or all thinking – the strain would be too great – but, all living; that is to say, we should be in touch wherever we go, whatever we hear, whatever we see, with some manner of vital interest.” -Charlotte Mason

Life should be all living.  I think of this quote just about daily.

 

“Never be within doors when you can rightly be without.” -Charlotte Mason

I do love this one too!

 

“The question is not, — how much does the youth know? when he has finished his education — but how much does he care? and about how many orders of things does he care? In fact, how large is the room in which he finds his feet set? and, therefore, how full is the life he has before him?” -Charlotte Mason

How large is the room?  I love it!!  What a great view of education.

 

“The most common and the monstrous defect in the education of the day is that children fail to acquire the habit of reading.” -Charlotte Mason

Yes!  It’s a great habit that is worth the investment.

Homeschool Physical Education Ideas

There are so many ways to sneak physical education into your homeschool day. Whether you’re looking to get super active or have low impact physical activity, these 5 homeschool physical education ideas will get the kids out and active before you know it. Each of these ideas will help you satisfy the phys. ed. part of your homeschool curriculum.  This post contains affiliate links.

Homeschool Physical Education Ideas

Homeschool Physical Education Ideas

Nature Journal

– Hiking

Get outdoors and go on a hike with your kids for homeschool phys. ed. There are many hiking trails all over the states for your kids to enjoy. There’s a bonus with this physical education option, your kids can do some nature journaling while out on the hiking trails too.  CamelBak Mini Mule Kids Hydration Backpacks are great to keep kids hydrated while on the trail.

– Swimming

If you don’t own a swimming pool, have no worries, you can easily sneak some swimming in for your homeschool physical education by going to the community pool, a local river, or pond. These options for swimming will provide your kids with some fun too.  (Check out our Puddle Jumper review if you have young kids)

– Old School Games

Teach your kids to enjoy some of your old school outdoor games like four square, capture the flag or kick the can. This is a fun way to give your kids some knowledge of how you enjoyed physical education as a child all the while helping them get their homeschool phys. ed. completed.

– Obstacle Course

Have your kids build their own indoor or outdoor obstacle course. This is a great way to promote creative thinking and problem-solving skills all the while giving your kids a way to get their homeschool physical education completed during your homeschooling days.  Our favorite go-to obstacle courses usually include a balance beam, walking down a wedge ramp, crawling through a tunnel, walking across stepping stones, climbing up our Nugget couch tower, and jumping into a pile of bean bags and pillows.

– Workout DVDs

Lastly, if all else fails and it’s too rainy or gloomy to do any of the above homeschool physical education ideas, you can pull out the workout DVDs. Have your kids do a daily workout to get active and in shape during their homeschool day with their favorite workout DVDs.  If you don’t have any DVDs YouTube has a ton of workout ideas for kids.  There’s even adults breaking a sweat dancing to Frozen songs.

Finding unique ways to create and plan your homeschool phys. ed. curriculum is one of the best parts of being a parent who teaches their kids. These ideas will come in handy when you’re at a loss as to what to do for physical education during your homeschool week. There are many ways you can work to develop a homeschool phys. ed. curriculum. This is quite honestly one of the easier parts of homeschooling your kid because we all know how to get up, get active, and have fun!

 

How to Create a Car Travel Journal With Your Kids

Many parents enjoy traveling with their kids to make memories (road trips can be amazing!! Check out our list of Great American Road Trips), but what are you doing to capture those moments? I think that we often feel our kids will hang onto these memories that we’re making as we travel around with them to see new places, but the reality is sometimes you need a journal to truly capture those traveling moments as a family. If you’re looking for a new journaling idea for homeschool or perhaps you simply want to create an awesome travel journal with your kids, then here are some tips to help you make this happen!  This post is brought to you by Pearsontoyotascion.com.

How to Create a Travel Journal With Your Kids

How to Create a Travel Journal With Your Kids

– Let Your Kids Make A Journal

While you can purchase a travel journal for kids online, it’s always more memorable to have your kids make their own journal. Gather up the three-ring binder and lined notebook paper. Put together a binder of journaling printables with lined notepad paper to provide many options for travel journaling.

– Bring The Tools

Using a small flexible pencil case bring along scissors, markers, crayons, pencils and any other journaling tools that your kids may need to document their memories in this travel journey during your family road trips.  You could store this in the glove compartment or have a special bin in the car that holds all of their supplies.

– Lead by Example

Keep a car travel journal of your own.  We love to document how many cars from different states we see on trips, how traffic was, and all the fun or extraordinary events that take place.

– Encourage Writing

While most adults enjoy reflecting about their day at the end of the night, many kids aren’t quite in that mindset. Encourage your kids to write in their journal during the day when their memories are close to their heart, so that they can truly journal the most from their traveling day.

– Don’t Micro-Manage

While you may want to micro-manage the process of journaling, this is not the time nor place to do so. Allowing your kids to journal during your travel adventures is a great way to let your kids show you their best grammar and vocabulary knowledge, but you can review that later on after your vacation.  It’s so hard to not do this, it’s a struggle with every. single. journal entry but it has to be done.  They need the freedom to express themselves without worrying about spelling every last word correctly…besides, it would be pretty annoying for you to spell every other word to them. 🙂

– Offer Prompts

Some kids aren’t equipped with the skills to come up with creative things to journal about during your time traveling, so consider giving your kids prompts each day during your time on the road. Don’t force your kids to use the prompts, simply have them written down each day to help them think deeper.

Having your kids create a travel journal will be a wonderful way to help them improve their grammar, vocabulary and handwriting skills all the while capturing their favorite family moments of your family travel events.

How to Start Identifying Birds By Their Songs

Going bird watching can be a very fun experience for anyone. People of all ages really enjoy watching what birds land in their backyard or sing from the trees up above. While this is a fun way to get in touch with nature and the world around us, I often wonder how to identify birds by their songs. This idea really had me thinking and so I did some research to figure out a way to help my kids learn this concept of identifying birds by their songs. I wanted to share some of the information with you today so that you can start naming that bird by their song, a concept that’s called “birding by ear”.

How to Start Identifying Birds By Their Songs

How to Start Identifying Birds By Their Songs

Focus and Analyze

Since there may be many birds singing at once, it may be difficult to hone in on one bird song over the rest. That’s why it’s important to really open your ears when you’re “birding by ear”. Learning the various songs of the most common birds that frequent your backyard will take a lot of focus at first as you figured out which bird is singing which song.

Figured Out the Syllables

One of the more common birds to identify is the Barrel Owl as their song sounds much like “who cooks for you”. The syllables of the bird songs will help you to identify birds by their songs. Take a moment to listen to the number of notes, also referred to as syllables, and the tone of each note to help you identify your backyard birds by their songs.

Make a Memory Hook

Once you’ve figured out the syllables of each bird song you can easily make some sort of memory hook, such as the Barrel Owl’s “who cooks for you” as a means to remember which bird song is related to the specific bird breed. The Common Yellowthroat bird has a note that sounds like “witchity-witchity-witchity” but you may find another memory hook helps you remember this bird breed when identifying this bird by its song.

Download Song Sleuth

This app is available for both Apple and Android devices here. Song Sleuth will help you learn the bird songs so that you can better identify your backyard birds by their song. You simply use Song Sleuth to listen to the birds around you and the app will use your recording to help tell you what bird species you’re hearing so that you can save this identifier to help get used to what bird songs belong to which bird breed.

Being able to identify birds by their songs is a fun way to spend quality time with family outside. Not only does this “birding by ear” concept help you enjoy more of your backyard together, but it’s a fun way to help teach your kids about the bird species that frequent your local region. Using my tips to help you start identifying birds by their songs will surely help you and your kids appreciate the birds on a deeper level as you learn their songs and more about their singing habits.

5 Ways to Keep Kids Busy in the Backseat

With the holiday season approaching many parents are wondering how to keep kids busy in the backseat. This is such a challenging concept for parents with kids of all ages. While you’d think preteens and teens can self-entertain, just take them on a long road trip to visit family and see how well that truly entertain themselves. Since kids of all ages may need some entertainment options during a long holiday travel road trip, I wanted to share some of the best ways you can keep these kids busy in the backseat.  This post is brought to you by Easterns.com.

5 Ways to Keep Kids Busy in the Backseat

5 Ways to Keep Kids Busy in the Backseat

Printable Games

There are so many printable games that kids of all ages can enjoy in the backseat. Car bingo and i-Spy come to mind as two childhood favorites that kids can enjoy playing while they’re patiently waiting to arrive at your next family holiday gathering.

Portable DVD Player

Whether you love or hate electronics, the sad reality is that our kids are growing up with technology all around them. A two-hour movie or two will keep your kids busy in the backseat. Have the kids take a vote before leaving what DVDs will be played in the backseat to avoid sibling rivalry on the road.

MP3 Player

Grab an MP3 player or a smartphone with a music app downloaded for use in the car. Have your kids create their own holiday travel playlist that they can listen to during the long haul to visit family. If you don’t have a device for each kid, consider playing each list over the car radio during your travels.

Paper and Drawing Utensils

Get a little holiday travel tote bag that’s full of drawing utensils like crayons, markers, and pencils as well as pads of paper. This will give your kids plenty of supplies to draw on and enjoy playing games like Hangman or Tic Tac Toe together in the backseat during long road trips.

Bring Audiobooks

Take this time to give your kids a little homeschooling on the road. Download audiobooks that will help your kids learn about your current topics you’ve been studying. This allows you to do some homeschooling on the road during the heavy holiday travel season.  Check out our Family Audiobooks.

There you have it, my top 5 ways to keep kids busy in the backseat. As you can see my ideas will work for most any age group and will help your kids remain calm so that you can arrive at your destination in one piece.

4 Tips for Parents New to Homeschooling

Starting your child in a homeschooling program can seem complicated. In the past, parents and guardians were largely on their own when it came to educating their children. This was both the greatest benefit of homeschooling and the most difficult aspect.

Nowadays, vast resources and online curriculum courses are available to parents who are interested in starting their children in an online homeschooling program. Below are four tips to keep in mind that will help you get started on the right path to finding the correct program and curriculum that meets the needs of your child.

1. Get In Touch

While some homeschooling parents prefer to stay completely independent, most first-timers homeschoolers appreciate having a network of support, whether in-person or online. If you don’t know many people already involved in homeschooling, get in contact with the Homeschool Association in your state. Furthermore, you can search on Facebook to find local, national, and global groups dedicated to helping homeschool parents.

You don’t have to be a vocal member of these communities to gain benefits. At first, it’s best to read the forums and discussion threads to learn the main topics and issues among your peers. Once you’re comfortable with the lingo, you can start asking questions and utilizing available resources, which are often free. In time, you’ll become a valued and experienced member of the community, regardless of how active you are.

2. Check Local Laws

Homeschooling is legal in all 50 states. It’s a trusted method of instruction in homes across the US and abroad. You have the right to educate your child in the best way you see fit.

Some states offer a great deal of freedom for homeschoolers, requiring no notification or evaluation before beginning. Others require some form of notice, while a handful require certifications and required testing.

The Home School Legal Defense Association provides a map of each state’s regulation status and explains the requirements throughout the nation. While it may be frustrating to comply with these rules, doing so will ensure your child maintains a successful educational path well into the future.

Homeschool Play

3. Learn How Your Child Learns

Everyone learns differently. You may have heard that there are 3 different types of learners: audio, visual, and kinesthetic. Some researchers say there are seven learning styles, while still others insist there are endless different types of learners!

Instead of putting your child into a simple category, spend some time discussing their preferences and evaluating how they best understand learning material. Do they prefer to read and study on their own in silence? Do they like having visual stimuli like videos and interactive media? Do they learn best completely on their own, or are they more suited to studying alongside a sibling or friend?

A child’s learning style evolves over time, and understanding their needs is an ongoing process. Part of the joy of homeschooling is watching your child grow as a student. Do your best and be open to changing your plans as you go along.

4. Start Deschooling

To deschool means, essentially, to unlearn the habits of public schooling. In traditional schools, we’re taught to raise our hands to go to the bathroom, sit quietly for hours on end, take required classes and courses we have no interest in…. It’s quite a world apart compared to homeschool!

If you went to public school as a child, these habits are probably ingrained in your memory. Deschooling is doubly important if your child has been a part of the school system recently. Make it clear to your new student that the expectations of public school don’t entirely apply in the home. You’ll set the standards and pace alongside your child.

With clear expectations, strong goals, and an open mindedness toward education, you and your child can thrive in a homeschool environment.

Tips for Homeschooling on the Road for Traveling Families

Being able to homeschool is truly a blessing because your kids can experience more of the world and learn on your terms. With that being said, there are some tips that homeschooling families should learn as a means to make homeschooling in the car a valuable experience. If you’re a traveling family or just find that you’ve been so busy that you’ll have to homeschool on the road during a family vacation, then you’ll enjoy these tips for homeschooling on the road.  This post is brought to you by WinnerFordofDover.com.

Tips for Homeschooling on the Road for Travel Families

Tips for Homeschooling on the Road for Travel Families

Get Prepared

Look over the lessons that you’ll be teaching your kids while homeschooling on the road. Make sure you opt to choose from lessons that won’t need a lot of supplies. Opting to prepare for your homeschooling on the road sessions will mean that you’ll get the supplies ready, choose lessons that make more sense for homeschooling in the car, and work to allow all kids to learn something similar at the same time.

Plan for Stops

If you’re going to be traveling in the car for long distances, make sure you plan for a stop along the route. This will allow your kids to get some reading and other lessons completed outside of the car. You may want to pick some historical landmarks to stop to work on a homeschool history lesson with your kids while homeschooling on the road.

Review Lessons

While it’s best to choose the harder lessons for at home homeschooling sessions, you may need to teach some of the harder homeschool lessons on the road. It’s best to prepare with a tri-fold poster board to help keep kids focused while trying to get some of the harder lessons done. You may also opt to find a location with no distractions to get out, stretch and learn on the road when you have a difficult lesson to teach the kids while traveling in a car.

Make a Checklist

Last, but not least, make a checklist of supplies that you’ll need to make the most of your homeschool lessons on the road. This means getting pencils sharpened, bringing a pencil sharpener, plenty of paper, journals, and books as well as any other supplies that you’ll need for each lesson in your curriculum while homeschooling on the road.

If you take the time to review what lessons you’ll be working on during your homeschooling in the car adventures, you’ll find that the kids learn better and focus easier. This is one of the benefits of being a homeschool family, you can educate your kids pretty much anywhere. There’s always a way to educate your kids in history, math, science and social studies when you’re a traveling family who’s well-prepared for homeschool lessons in the car.

Silver Glue and Gold Foil Slime

Making slime is a favorite pastime for my kids. While this type of craft can be messy at times, it’s such a fun way to experiment with new ingredients and have some fun with your kids. I recently created a silver glue and gold foil slime that looks spectacular. As a means to help inspire you to start making beautiful slime with your family, I’m sharing some information about this slime along with a recipe to help guide you forward in making your own silver glue and gold foil slime with your kids today. This post contains affiliate links.

Silver Slime

A Fun Science and Chemistry Experiment

There are so many unique ways to educate children these days and making silver glue and gold foil slime is just one of the best ways to teach some science and chemistry in a home school environment. Whether you homeschool or not, using this fun craft idea as a means to educate your kids about chemistry and science is a fun time for everyone.

You’ll be teaching a concept called cross-linking when you mix the borate ions, known as slime activators, with the silver glue. These two ingredients mixed collide into a chemical reaction that creates the stretchy slime substance that kids enjoy playing with.

Elmers Silver Glitter Slime

The silver glue is a liquid substance that is made of molecules that help keep it in a liquid state until you mix the borate ions into the silver glue. The borate has ingredients that mix with the silver glue molecules repeated until the silver glue is no longer in a liquid state, rather when the mixture turns to slime it’s called a polymer.

Bet you didn’t realize there’s so much to learn from making this simple silver glue and gold foil slime with your kids? Use this fun craft time as a means to teach your kids about how molecules work and what active ingredients in the slime activators (sodium borate, borax powder, or boric acid) do with the silver glue to transition the glue from a liquid to a polymer.

Is slime a liquid or a solid?

This is a tricky question to answer because at the end of the day this silver glue and gold foil slime is neither a liquid nor a solid. Slime is a creation that seems to be both a liquid and a solid. You can play around with the ingredients to make this silver glue and gold foil slime appear to be more of a solid than a liquid, but in all reality, this substance that’s called polymer is more of a mixture between the liquid and solid-state.

Now that you’ve read a little bit about how this silver glue and gold foil slime can be a fun science and chemistry learning experiment, it’s time to follow the instructions below to make your own batch of silver glue and gold foil slime today.

How to make silver and gold glitter slime:

Basically, start slow, mix in the starch, add a little more, mix again, and keep doing that till it’s no longer sticky.  Toward the end of mixing you may have to knead it with your hands instead of a spoon.  There we go, now that my disclaimer is out of the way, let’s begin!

This silver and gold glitter slime needs a few specific ingredients, so let’s talk about that first. 

  • – Elmer’s Classic Glitter Glue.  I bought mine from a local craft store but found the Elmer’s Silver Glitter Glue cheaper on Amazon right now.  Keep in mind Amazon prices often fluctuate but it’s at a steal of a price right now.

In fact, there’s also a bundle pack of Elmer’s Glitter Glue to save you money and allow you to make a rainbow of slime options.

I’m a liquid starch slime fan but usually more glitter will show through when you use a contact lens solution plus baking soda instead.  This is because contact lens solution is clear and liquid starch has a kind of white-ish blue tinge.  Both of these options will make a great activator.
This one is a glitter glue so be prepared for it takes way more starch than a white glue would.  We used around 3/4ths of a cup but always add 1/4 a cup at a time and mix it in well.  When you get a consistency that no longer sticks to you and feels like you want it too you’re done.  Again, it’s not an exact science.

Silver Glitter Slime

Now onto the fun pictures of playing with the gold foil sheets.  These are incredible and I want to try them in all my future slimes.  They are just so neat!  They can also be found on Amazon here – Gold Foil Sheets.  Prices often change but right now you can get 100 sheets of this for less than $6 shipped.  I still can’t believe how affordable this fun crafting material is!

Silver Gold Foil Glitter Slime

Silver Gold Leaf Slime

Silver Gold Foil Slime

 

Gold Foil Slime

Gold Foil Silver Slime

Gold Foil Stretchy Silver Slime

Stretchy Silver Slime

Super Stretchy Silver Slime

Stretchy Silver Gold Leaf Slime

Stretchy Slime

Isn’t it beautiful?  I just adore it!

Gold Rolled Slime

I hope you and your kids can give our silver and gold glitter slime a try for yourself.  It truly is the prettiest slime I’ve ever made to date.  It rivals any of the expensive store bought putties and with slime you can create it to be the exact texture you want.  I love it!

More Ideas for Homeschooling in the Car

Homeschooling in the car is my way of describing taking the free time we have in the car and sometimes using it for educational purposes.  I’m not advocating for families to bring their workbooks along with them everywhere and wear their children out on school work.  Learning should be fun and a normal part of life.

This post is brought to you by AkinsJeepRam.com.

I hope this continued list of homeschooling in the car will help you enjoy your kids and make the most of your time in the car.  See our first post on Car Homeschooling here.

  • – Complete the story

This is one of my favorite games to play but is one of the hardest for me to play when driving so I usually have to sit out but I love hearing the stories my kids create.  One person begins to tell a story about anything at all.  After a few sentences they say, “and then…” Then the next person jumps in and adds a few more sentences to the story.  “and then…”   “and then…”  You get the picture.  The story can end anytime you want or after a set number of rounds.  Ours usually ends in full on belly laughs.  I love it!  It’s silly but works their creative juices, listening skills, comprehension, and vocabulary.

  • – License plate addition

One day my husband revealed that he has always had the quirk of adding license plate numbers in his head and I thought that was a great idea!  I held onto the idea until my kids were more fluent with their math skills but this is a great one.

  • – License plate rounding

After my husband shared the above game with us I transitioned it to a game that worked better for our kids at that time.  We decided to round the license plate number to the nearest ten, or hundred, you get the idea.  This was a fun game because it required them to think quickly.  When we first started we had the kids read the number out loud so we could help them with it in case the car drove away quickly.

  • – Geography game

Everyone names a location that begins with a letter of the alphabet beginning with A and going through to Z, while repeating the ones that were listed before. Alps, Belgium, China, Denmark…

  • – Jokes and Riddles

My kids are going through a stage where jokes and riddles are the bees knees.  They love them and always have a new joke to tell anyone they meet.  One of the favorites lately is, “What did the cat get when he crossed the desert on Christmas Day?”  The answer is….”sandy claws.”  Thinking through jokes and finding the humor in twisting the English language can be a challenging and rewarding experience.  I think that the rather dull opportunity that car trips provide is a great atmosphere for telling good old fashioned jokes.

I’ll be brainstorming more ideas for homeschooling with in the car and I hope you’ll share any and all ideas you have with me in the comments below.

Homeschooling in the Car

Do you find that you spend more time than you care to admit in the car?  I can vividly remember a friend’s mom mention to us while we were in junior high (yes, not middle school, I’m getting old) that if she lost weight driving her kids around that she would be much too thin. I guess it’s a good thing that wasn’t the case but I’ve often thought about that sentiment and wished it were true for myself.  As a homeschooling mom I want to make the most of the time I spend with my kids and find ways to fit in educational moments throughout the day, even on errand days and between trips to the park, friend’s houses, co-ops, libraries, and Walmart pick up (which is such a blessing!).  We don’t do school full on all the time, but I wanted to find ways to utilize the time in the car and not spend it surfing the radio endlessly.  Here are the tips that my family make use of and I hope it helps your family enjoy spending time with their kids in the car, whether you call it “carschooling” or not.

This post is brought to you by MarburgerChryslerJeepDodgeRam.com.

  • – Talk

Okay, I had to start with this one because it seems the most obvious to people and it is the thing we do most of all.  We talk about what we’re doing (as has been the practice since before my kids could talk), plans we hope to do in the near future, how we feel about things, what we’ve been reading, things we saw on Alexa (which brings up so many interesting political and earth science discussions), and the list goes on and on.  Discussing things with kids opens the lines of communication and can help develop healthy relationships…the educational aspect is just a bonus.

  • – Audio books

By clicking here you can see the list of my favorite audio books for the whole family.  Audio books are better for long trips but they can be utilized for shorter trips as well.  My kids get so into the books though that they always hate to stop a story without things being wrapped up neatly.

  • – Twenty questions

We play this game a lot in our house.  Sometimes we’ll pick a book that we have and everyone else has to ask questions to figure out which one it is.  Animals and people are also good choices.

  • – iSpy

iSpy is a game that can be played with younger and older kids a like and it’s always fun.  To make it a little more challenging you could have the kids guess that particular -ing word, or -ly adverb.

  • – Memory work

If my kids are working on memorizing verses or a particular poem I’ll make a copy and set it in the passengers car.  Every time I get in the car I’ll recite the memory work.  After a few days I’ll expect them to finish it after I start it.  Then a few days later they’ll try reciting it on their own.  I’ve been amazed at how very quickly they can recall information when repeated in this way.

  • – Observe the world around you

My kids have always spotted school buses and city buses when we’re out.  It’s always been something they point out.  Other favorites are three wheel motorcycles (I don’t know the correct name, sorry!), fire trucks, diggers, trash trucks, Ashley furniture trucks (because my name is Ashley), etc.  One family I know assigns points for each special vehicle and the family keeps score of what they’ve all seen for a month.  For example motorcycles=10 points, emergency vehicles=10 points, emergency vehicles with their lights on=15 points.  I haven’t tried this yet but I can see how it would be helpful to practice math skills.

I’m sure there are more but these are our main ways to make the best use of the time we spend together in the car.  If you have anything to add I would love to hear your ideas.

Update: I’ve added more ideas for homeschooling in the car here.